thought reservoir
Bb
thought reservoir
+
curiouser-and-curiouser666:

What I send to my ex when they talk to me about how much they miss me
+
+
singersavenue:

Gwen Stefani’s Vocal Profile
Vocal Type: Lyric Mezzo-Soprano
Vocal Range: D3 - B6 [ 3 Octaves 5 Notes ]
+
+
+
lovelightsupyourlife:

Hottest tab open unter We Heart It.
+
+
tomorrow-for-today:

Lol finn!
+
+
+
+
pittsburghisbeautiful:

Drinks menu at the former Quiet Storm on Penn Avenue in Garfield.
+

"Now Or Never" (1921)
+
loladelphia:

Holmesburg Prison on Torresdale Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia is a fascinating place because of its controversial history. 
The prison was built in 1896 and operated until 1995. With other prisons being built in later years on State Road, Holmesburg Prison has been converted for use to handle training programs, work programs for the prisoners, and handles prisoner overflow. While it’s not expected that a prison would have a pleasant history, Holmesburg’s history is particularly gristly and disturbing.
Over the years, Holmesburg Prison was the home of several prison riots, and was also the site of extensive dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical experiments performed on inmates:
It was here that the US government did some of its testing for Project MKUltra—a CIA sponsored program in which behavioral engineering of humans was studied using drugs, torture, and abuse. 
Another study, sponsored by UPenn professor Robert Kligman and Dow Chemical Company exposed inmates to Dioxin, a powerful cancer-causing chemical found in Agent Orange. Dow had been manufacturing it for use in the the Vietnam War at the time, but wanted to test the Dioxin to examine its effects on the skin. As a result, Kligman and Dow purposely exposed some prisoners to the chemical leading to severe mental and physical health problems.
It was estimated that at one point, 9 out of 10 prisoners at Holmesburg were subjected to unethical testing of some variety. Kligman was hired by the government to test skin-blistering materials and cosmetics in the 1960’s to study the “skin-hardening process.” Kligman was also reported as stating upon his arrival at Holmesburg, “All I could see was acres of skin.”
Furthermore, this was also a place of violence. Several riots took place here in the 1970’s, and a report released in 1968 detailed hundreds of cases of rape that took place within the walls. Here are some of the details from an article that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1995:
Patrick N. Curran was warden and Robert F. Fromhold was his deputy in 1973, when two inmates who had come to speak to them with a complaint produced prison-made shivs and stabbed the officials to death.
The heat was turned up to 190 degrees in mid-August, and when the doors were opened after 58 hours, four inmates had (in the coroner’s words) ”roasted to death.” Ten officials and guards were tried, but only two were convicted and given light sentences of 1 to 3 years
* In 1952, inmate Thomas Donato was found dead in a bathtub. Officials said he had drowned. An autopsy showed he had been beaten to death.
* Blood spattered the walls and soaked the floor in the mess hall on July 4, 1970, as about 250 inmates - some armed with knives, meat cleavers and table legs - attacked other inmates and guards and took over part of the prison. Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo, heading a 400-man raiding team, restored order. Sixty-nine inmates and 27 guards required some hospitalization. One prisoner’s hand was nearly chopped off by a cleaver.
* In 1966, the Food and Drug Administration censured a University of Pennsylvania doctor for improper record-keeping. He had used countless prisoners in scores of tests of new drugs for 33 different pharmaceutical firms. Later, an inmate lab assistant was arrested for using the position to coerce sex from weaker inmates.
* Prisoners claimed many were beaten by guards in retaliation for a five- hour riot in October 1989 that injured 94 inmates and 54 guards.
Interestingly (and ironically) enough, it was also in Holmesburg where prisoners were put to work constructing desks to be used at City Hall, and manufacturing ammunition for the Philadelphia Police Department to use as target practice. In the 1940’s, prisoners also participated in a farming program growing and canning their own food. However, despite the prison’s work programs, its legacy of a “violent hell-hole” remain and rightfully so. I’ll end this post with a couple quotes from Alan Davis, who served as Philadelphia’s assistant district attorney and comprehensively studied Philadelphia’s prison system in 1968:
"Holmesburg is more brutalizing than the most inhumane prison of the 1800s. The men learn to respond as animals inside, and when they get out, they act like animals."
———————————
Further reading:
Philly.com article
Abandoned US article (with pictures!)
loladelphia:

Holmesburg Prison on Torresdale Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia is a fascinating place because of its controversial history. 
The prison was built in 1896 and operated until 1995. With other prisons being built in later years on State Road, Holmesburg Prison has been converted for use to handle training programs, work programs for the prisoners, and handles prisoner overflow. While it’s not expected that a prison would have a pleasant history, Holmesburg’s history is particularly gristly and disturbing.
Over the years, Holmesburg Prison was the home of several prison riots, and was also the site of extensive dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical experiments performed on inmates:
It was here that the US government did some of its testing for Project MKUltra—a CIA sponsored program in which behavioral engineering of humans was studied using drugs, torture, and abuse. 
Another study, sponsored by UPenn professor Robert Kligman and Dow Chemical Company exposed inmates to Dioxin, a powerful cancer-causing chemical found in Agent Orange. Dow had been manufacturing it for use in the the Vietnam War at the time, but wanted to test the Dioxin to examine its effects on the skin. As a result, Kligman and Dow purposely exposed some prisoners to the chemical leading to severe mental and physical health problems.
It was estimated that at one point, 9 out of 10 prisoners at Holmesburg were subjected to unethical testing of some variety. Kligman was hired by the government to test skin-blistering materials and cosmetics in the 1960’s to study the “skin-hardening process.” Kligman was also reported as stating upon his arrival at Holmesburg, “All I could see was acres of skin.”
Furthermore, this was also a place of violence. Several riots took place here in the 1970’s, and a report released in 1968 detailed hundreds of cases of rape that took place within the walls. Here are some of the details from an article that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1995:
Patrick N. Curran was warden and Robert F. Fromhold was his deputy in 1973, when two inmates who had come to speak to them with a complaint produced prison-made shivs and stabbed the officials to death.
The heat was turned up to 190 degrees in mid-August, and when the doors were opened after 58 hours, four inmates had (in the coroner’s words) ”roasted to death.” Ten officials and guards were tried, but only two were convicted and given light sentences of 1 to 3 years
* In 1952, inmate Thomas Donato was found dead in a bathtub. Officials said he had drowned. An autopsy showed he had been beaten to death.
* Blood spattered the walls and soaked the floor in the mess hall on July 4, 1970, as about 250 inmates - some armed with knives, meat cleavers and table legs - attacked other inmates and guards and took over part of the prison. Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo, heading a 400-man raiding team, restored order. Sixty-nine inmates and 27 guards required some hospitalization. One prisoner’s hand was nearly chopped off by a cleaver.
* In 1966, the Food and Drug Administration censured a University of Pennsylvania doctor for improper record-keeping. He had used countless prisoners in scores of tests of new drugs for 33 different pharmaceutical firms. Later, an inmate lab assistant was arrested for using the position to coerce sex from weaker inmates.
* Prisoners claimed many were beaten by guards in retaliation for a five- hour riot in October 1989 that injured 94 inmates and 54 guards.
Interestingly (and ironically) enough, it was also in Holmesburg where prisoners were put to work constructing desks to be used at City Hall, and manufacturing ammunition for the Philadelphia Police Department to use as target practice. In the 1940’s, prisoners also participated in a farming program growing and canning their own food. However, despite the prison’s work programs, its legacy of a “violent hell-hole” remain and rightfully so. I’ll end this post with a couple quotes from Alan Davis, who served as Philadelphia’s assistant district attorney and comprehensively studied Philadelphia’s prison system in 1968:
"Holmesburg is more brutalizing than the most inhumane prison of the 1800s. The men learn to respond as animals inside, and when they get out, they act like animals."
———————————
Further reading:
Philly.com article
Abandoned US article (with pictures!)
loladelphia:

Holmesburg Prison on Torresdale Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia is a fascinating place because of its controversial history. 
The prison was built in 1896 and operated until 1995. With other prisons being built in later years on State Road, Holmesburg Prison has been converted for use to handle training programs, work programs for the prisoners, and handles prisoner overflow. While it’s not expected that a prison would have a pleasant history, Holmesburg’s history is particularly gristly and disturbing.
Over the years, Holmesburg Prison was the home of several prison riots, and was also the site of extensive dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical experiments performed on inmates:
It was here that the US government did some of its testing for Project MKUltra—a CIA sponsored program in which behavioral engineering of humans was studied using drugs, torture, and abuse. 
Another study, sponsored by UPenn professor Robert Kligman and Dow Chemical Company exposed inmates to Dioxin, a powerful cancer-causing chemical found in Agent Orange. Dow had been manufacturing it for use in the the Vietnam War at the time, but wanted to test the Dioxin to examine its effects on the skin. As a result, Kligman and Dow purposely exposed some prisoners to the chemical leading to severe mental and physical health problems.
It was estimated that at one point, 9 out of 10 prisoners at Holmesburg were subjected to unethical testing of some variety. Kligman was hired by the government to test skin-blistering materials and cosmetics in the 1960’s to study the “skin-hardening process.” Kligman was also reported as stating upon his arrival at Holmesburg, “All I could see was acres of skin.”
Furthermore, this was also a place of violence. Several riots took place here in the 1970’s, and a report released in 1968 detailed hundreds of cases of rape that took place within the walls. Here are some of the details from an article that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1995:
Patrick N. Curran was warden and Robert F. Fromhold was his deputy in 1973, when two inmates who had come to speak to them with a complaint produced prison-made shivs and stabbed the officials to death.
The heat was turned up to 190 degrees in mid-August, and when the doors were opened after 58 hours, four inmates had (in the coroner’s words) ”roasted to death.” Ten officials and guards were tried, but only two were convicted and given light sentences of 1 to 3 years
* In 1952, inmate Thomas Donato was found dead in a bathtub. Officials said he had drowned. An autopsy showed he had been beaten to death.
* Blood spattered the walls and soaked the floor in the mess hall on July 4, 1970, as about 250 inmates - some armed with knives, meat cleavers and table legs - attacked other inmates and guards and took over part of the prison. Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo, heading a 400-man raiding team, restored order. Sixty-nine inmates and 27 guards required some hospitalization. One prisoner’s hand was nearly chopped off by a cleaver.
* In 1966, the Food and Drug Administration censured a University of Pennsylvania doctor for improper record-keeping. He had used countless prisoners in scores of tests of new drugs for 33 different pharmaceutical firms. Later, an inmate lab assistant was arrested for using the position to coerce sex from weaker inmates.
* Prisoners claimed many were beaten by guards in retaliation for a five- hour riot in October 1989 that injured 94 inmates and 54 guards.
Interestingly (and ironically) enough, it was also in Holmesburg where prisoners were put to work constructing desks to be used at City Hall, and manufacturing ammunition for the Philadelphia Police Department to use as target practice. In the 1940’s, prisoners also participated in a farming program growing and canning their own food. However, despite the prison’s work programs, its legacy of a “violent hell-hole” remain and rightfully so. I’ll end this post with a couple quotes from Alan Davis, who served as Philadelphia’s assistant district attorney and comprehensively studied Philadelphia’s prison system in 1968:
"Holmesburg is more brutalizing than the most inhumane prison of the 1800s. The men learn to respond as animals inside, and when they get out, they act like animals."
———————————
Further reading:
Philly.com article
Abandoned US article (with pictures!)
+
Happy birthday to the original Queen B